The Absurdity of Female Fantasy Armor

Whether we’d like to admit it or not, a lot of sexism exists in the world of Fantasy and comics. Many times, women are drawn with disproportionate body shapes, and wearing highly impractical armor (would you like to wear a bikini to war?). Now we’ve heard the usual argument:

“The armor is magic. The rest of the body is protected by charms.”

Question-how come men’s armor is never built that way? Why don’t men ever get enchanted, tight-fitted loinskins?
When the critically acclaimed Wonderwoman was first released on the big screen, there was a lot of excitement over it being the first ever major superhero film directed by a woman. The difference between the costume design of the new film versus older versions was highly noticeable, and shared throughout social media:

Now, to be honest, even the old wonder woman costumes really aren’t too bad in comparison to some of the other fantasy armors out there. In fact, who is to say that women didn’t actually dress like that into battle back in the day? (Although, historically,  women didn’t battle so often to begin with). If you’ve seen the film 300, you’ll notice that the fierce Spartan men  were portrayed in armor not so different than that of the Amazonians. Maybe ancient warriors did in fact choose to wear less clothing into battle, especially regarding heavy metals.

Vs

The problem isn’t in the modesty, or lack-there-of. I’m sure there were real cultures whose warriors even fought naked. No, the real problem is with the ornamental, semi-nude armor which simply makes no practical sense. If they wanted to be naked, they could be. If they wanted magical protection, they could’ve use an enchanted ring, or at least an outfit which doesn’t look outright ridiculous. At this point, it’s no longer acceptable fantasy attire. It’s eyecandy, plain and simple.

Whether we’d like to admit it or not, a lot of sexism exists in the world of Fantasy and comics. Many times, women are drawn with disproportionate body shapes, and wearing highly impractical armor (would you like to wear a bikini to war?). Now we’ve heard the usual argument:

“The armor is magic. The rest of the body is protected by charms.”

Question-how come men’s armor is never built that way? Why don’t men ever get enchanted, tight-fitted loinskins?
When the critically acclaimed Wonderwoman was first released on the big screen, there was a lot of excitement over it being the first ever major superhero film directed by a woman. The difference between the costume design of the new film versus older versions was highly noticeable, and shared throughout social media:

Now, to be honest, even the old wonder woman costumes really aren’t too bad in comparison to some of the other fantasy armors out there. In fact, who is to say that women didn’t actually dress like that into battle back in the day? (Although, historically,  women didn’t battle so often to begin with). If you’ve seen the film 300, you’ll notice that the fierce Spartan men  were portrayed in armor not so different than that of the Amazonians. Maybe ancient warriors did in fact choose to wear less clothing into battle, especially regarding heavy metals.

Vs

The problem isn’t in the modesty, or lack-there-of. I’m sure there were real cultures whose warriors even fought naked. No, the real problem is with the ornamental, semi-nude armor which simply makes no practical sense. If they wanted to be naked, they could be. If they wanted magical protection, they could’ve use an enchanted ring, or at least an outfit which doesn’t look outright ridiculous. At this point, it’s no longer acceptable fantasy attire. It’s eyecandy, plain and simple.